OLE’s Timeline of Early Education Work in New Mexico

OLE'sECETimeline012010

++ OLÉ, still a new organization (founded in 2009), began looking at ways in which we could organize workers and parents

++ Then-governor Bill Richardson announces a proposal to cut 7,000 children from
childcare rolls and cut 10% from the reimbursement rate to centers.

++ Initial reaction from parents and center owners stopped this action but also energized
parents, owners, teachers and organizers to create a movement that will benefit
parents, teachers and center owners – and most importantly, make early childhood
education accessible to every child in New Mexico

++ EEU re-launched and began organizing center owners and teachers

++ OLÉ creates the Working Parents Association and begins organizing parents.

The Working Parents Association was started by New Mexican parents to build a united voice for working families who want to improve access to quality, affordable early childhood education.


2011

++ A constitutional amendment is introduced in the Legislature in order to access the Land Grant Permanent Fund

++ 1.5% of the fund would create access for nearly every child in NM to have access to early childhood education

++ The measure is blocked in the Senate

++ OLÉ continues organizing parents and workers, begins exploring the idea of raising the minimum wage in Albuquerque

The Land Grant Permanent Fund is funded by subsidies from oil and gas drilling in New Mexico. The fund is holding strong at about $14 BILLION (and increasing) and funds education in New Mexico. The constitutional amendment would take 1.5% of the fund that will generate $150 million toward ECE! There are numerous studies that show this is the most financially sound solution toward funding ECE – and it doesn’t raise our taxes!

2012

++ A constitutional amendment is introduced in the Legislature in order to access the Land Grant Permanent Fund (again)

++ The measure is blocked in the Senate (again)

++ OLÉ launches a campaign to raise the minimum wage to $8.50 in Albuquerque. The measure wins with 66% of the vote. Certain members of City Council talk about over- turning the bill, but in the end, the Wage Warriors win!

++ The raise also affects servers and bartenders

Minimum wage earners are mainly female adults between 18-45. Minimum wage earners are supporting their families and often work more than one job. The Working Parents Association is comprised of all types of parents who are workers, students, single parents, co-parents, grandparents, etc. Raising the minimum wage doesn’t eradicate poverty, nor does it ease the cost of early childhood education, but the election has forced our communities and policy makers to seriously examine income inequality and take action toward an economy that is sustainable for families!

2013

++ A constitutional amendment is introduced in the Legislature in order to access the Land Grant Permanent Fund (again)

++ The measure is blocked in the Senate (again)

++ A minimum wage increase passes the House and Senate andis vetoed by Governor Susana Martinez

++ QELA is formed to represent ECE Center owners who are invested in increased accessibility for all New Mexican Children

++ New Mexico ranks 50th in child well-being. OLÉ members deliver a thank-you card from Mississippi to the members of the Legislative Finance Committee to shed light on NM’s dismal ranking.

The “Iron Triangle” shows the strength of our movement- parents, early educators and center owners working together to provide access to ECE for every child in NM so that parents know their children are in quality centers; raise the pay of early educators (who are mostly women) so that their income matches the work they do and their level of expertise; reimburse center owners at market rate so that our locally owned businesses are able to stay open and thrive!

2014

++ A constitutional amendment is introduced in the Legislature in order to access the Land Grant Permanent Fund (again)

++ The measure is blocked in the Senate (again)

++ QELA organizer Joan Baker and Center owners testify at the Health and Human Services legislative committee. Legislators from both parties are concerned about CYFD policies and promise to investigate

++ OLÉ organizers begin working with parents who are given unfair contracts from CYFD. OLÉ members also meet with CYFD officials in order to shed light on the issues that families across New Mexico are facing.

++ OLÉ members join People for the Kids board as well as OLÉ board in order to ensure parent voices are always heard

++ Susana Martinez is re-elected governor, installs former Tourism Secretary Monique Jacobson as head of CYFD

QELA, EEU and WPA members began signing Unity Agreements in 2014, which ensures that the interests of all parties are being served. WPA members began talking to the media and CYFD has had no choice but to pay attention to the concerns that working families are facing. By strengthening our voices, the WPA has gained a tremendous amount of momentum, and parents are now a guiding force of the work of OLÉ.

2015

++ Through the work of EEU, QELA and the WPA, two centers (and counting) have held union elections! This has huge implications for our movement!

++ A constitutional amendment is introduced in the Legislature in order to access the Land Grant Permanent Fund (again)

++ Other bills are introduced, including the Preschool Fair Share Fund and the Montessori Recognition Act. OLÉ, QELA and EEU members are pivotal in shaping this legislation!

++ Center owners, educators, parents and most importantly KIDS take over the Roundhouse for the 1,000 Kid March

++ Congressman Tom Udall and Congresswoman Michelle Lujan-Grisham speak out in support of funding ECE!

Parent leadership is the key to creating change for New Mexico’s families, as is working in partnership with center owners and early educators. We are a movement that cannot be stopped! Even as our kids transition to K-12 education, we know that there is a strong foundation that begins with ECE

2 thoughts on “OLE’s Timeline of Early Education Work in New Mexico

  1. Hey there would you mind sharing which blog platform you’re using?
    I’m planning to start my own blog in the near future
    but I’m having a hard time deciding between BlogEngine/Wordpress/B2evolution and
    Drupal. The reason I ask is because your design and style seems different then most
    blogs and I’m looking for something completely unique.
    P.S Apologies for getting off-topic but I had to ask!

    • We use WordPress.com. Took a theme, turned it into a child theme and edited it from there. Good luck on your future blog!

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